The Author

Madalina Sisu Vicari

Madalina Sisu Vicari is a PhD candidate at the University of Liège. Her main research interests are: the geopolitics of energy, energy security, Ukraine’s and Turkey’s energy cooperation with EU, EU-Russia energy relations, EU’s external energy governance, European regionalization. She holds a Master’s degree in International Relations and a Master’s degree in Communications and European Affairs.


The “energy dominance” term[1]  is both a major vow and focus of “America First” vision and a hallmark of the energy policies pursued by Trump administration.  It reflects the return of the United States as a leading global oil producer [2] but also the aim to dominate the global markets of liquefied natural gas (LNG).

Under the current administration, the LNG has increasingly become a nexus of the central points of United States’ trade, energy and foreign policies. The LNG exports are one of the priorities of Trump administration’s trade policy as they are seen as a way to address the US trade imbalances with other countries, despite of the fact that they could not make a significant dent in the overall deficit trade.

At the same time, the production of abundant and affordable energy, chiefly from oil and gas resources, and innovation harnessing are the cores of the “New Energy Realism”[3]. The New Energy Realism is a new term added to the expanding lexicon of Trump administration but also a concept that may be seen (by employing the lens of leniency, though, as it still lacks a more elaborated conceptualization)  as encompassing the approach, vision and directions of the energy policy currently pursued by the United States.

Exports of American fuels (including coal exports), and primarily the LNG exports, are seen by the current administration not solely through commercial lens but as a way through which other countries, “the friends and allies” of America, can lessen their dependence on “unfriendly nations”, and boost their energy security.[4]

 

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[1] White House, “Remarks by President Trump at the Unleashing American Energy Event”, June 29, 2017, https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-unleashing-american-energy-event/

[2] U.S. Energy Information Administration, “The United States is now the largest global crude oil producer”, September 12, 2018, https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=37053&src=email

[3] U.S. Department of Energy, “The New Energy Realism: Secretary Perry Remarks at CERA Week”, Week”, March 7, 2018, https://www.energy.gov/articles/new-energy-realism-secretary-perry-remarks-cera-week-prepared-delivery

[4] Ibid.

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One Response

  1. Rudolf Huber

    Again someone who wants to kick the ball without understanding the true dynamics in US LNG. US LNG sellers are not the government. That’s not like a state oil producer in the Middle East. Those are private companies, and they don’t give a damn about European politics or security of supply. All they want is making as much money as possible with their exports. And Trump cannot command them to give LNG to a country that’s an ally. He can arrange talks between parties, he can ask LNG projects in the US to also look into Europe, but Europe is not a premium market for any seller. It’s a flexibility tool to world LNG. No more – but no less as well.

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